Category

Tips and Tricks

Category

Using your index finger to pull the trigger is the traditional way to fire a gun, but according to the US Army, using your middle finger to pull the trigger can make you a better shot. According to the US Army, using your middle finger to pull the trigger allows you to rapidly and accurately shoot at a target. Here’s how it works. Anyone can simply point at an object (and be pretty accurate too). However, it’s different when firing a gun because instead of pointing at the object you have to line it up down the iron sights. When you pull the trigger with your middle finger, your index finger is free. That means you can use it to point at your target. Since we’re very accurate when we point at things, this method allows us to quickly point at an object without lining it up through the sights and…

If you’ve been on the Internet for longer than a day, you’ve probably seen some company handing out a tactical flashlight for Free. Hate to break it to you, but those lights are not tactical. Don’t get me wrong, they’ll light up a dark space, but, they’re not appropriate for tactical use. So what is appropriate? Glad you asked. We’re going to give you a run down on the 5 essentials to look for in a tactical flashlight. 5 things To Look For In A Tactical Flashlight At least 200 lumens You’re going to be hard-pressed to find a flashlight that’s below 200 lumens. However, if you’re tempted to get a flashlight that’s below 200 lumens, don’t fall to the temptation. There are 2 reasons to select a light that’s 200+ lumens. The first is because you need lumination when you’re in a non-threat situation. Imagine you’re using your light…

If you’ve ever shot a gun, you know all too well the familiar feel of recoil. Most shooters like the “feel” of recoil, but not too many like what it does to their shooting. Recoil has a nasty side-effect, it throws off your accuracy. Every time you fire a gun, that small explosion that results throws the entire gun and even your body out of alignment, While you might have been on target before your shot, your follow up shot will not necessarily be on target because recoil throws you off. That’s why it’s necessary to learn how to control recoil. Because if you don’t, then you’re never going to be as accurate as you’d like. To help mitigate the effects of recoil, there are 4 simple things you can do to control recoil. Take a look at these simple steps. 4 Steps For Helping Control Recoil Step 1: Stay…

One of the most common and most noticeable modifications you’ll see on the AR platform is the vertical foregrip. A vertical foregrip is a modular piece of polymer or metal that attaches to the bottom of your guns rail and runs vertically from the rail. While many people put them on their gun because they think they look cool, they actually have a utilitarian purpose in mind and are more than just a piece of “tacticool gear.” The original foregrips were designed to help give the user a better grip on their gun, both during live fire as well as during patrol scenarios where a person would ruck the rifle around for hours on end on patrol. And while the vertical foregrip was ubiquitous on ARs for years, a newer kind of grip attachment has emerged in the past 5-7 years. The angled foregrip. The angled foregrip mounts in roughly…

Accuracy is the name of the game when it comes to shooting. There’s nothing better than being able to put multiple rounds on target over and over again. Truth is without accurate shot placement, a gun is a useless noise maker. This is why so manufacturers pay so much attention to the gun’s features that greatly impact accuracy. If you want to be accurate you have to have an accurate gun. Novice shooters often assume the gun they have is perfectly set up to nail targets repeatedly. And while it’s true that many stock weapons come out of the factory with “built in accuracy,” the truth of the matter is there a number of things that can affect a gun’s accuracy. Whether that’s rough handling, the violence of recoil affecting site mechanism, and the addition of aftermarket parts, accuracy is never guaranteed This is why it’s important to guarantee your…

The only difference between a good shooter and a great shooter are the details

Whether it’s for your job, competition, or plain fun, shooting well takes more than just knowledge of guns. It takes a solid understanding of the fundamentals of marksmanship. For years, I’ve found the following fundamentals to be proven, simple to understand, and successful for students. Each fundamental listed is important, but the importance is not based on where it falls in the list — it’s up to you to decide what is important and when. They are:

Exterior Ballistics is simply the portion of a bullet’s flight once it leaves the muzzle until it hits the target. It is important for shooters to understand the forces at play during this window, if they have their sights set on accuracy.

As a firearm instructor, I often run across gadgets that claim to improve your shooting skills. There’s usually a lot of hype to get you to buy, but then once you do, you realize you’d have been better off spending your money on a private lesson with a professional.

When the Glock handgun hit the market in the mid-1980s, it was unprecedented for its use of polymer (a fancy name for plastic) in the frame. Just about every other handgun maker followed Glock’s lead, and now polymer-frame handguns are the most popular style on the market.